Muse On Fashion

Dec 5
Oct 12

Cordes Lumineuses

this is my newest jewelry shoot. We shot it in my rooftop, using long expossures and flashlights!

Thank you to the amazing photographer Severine Arend for her ideas and editing! And thank you to Henny J for helping me out!

Styling by Laura Acosta

Model - Patty Chen

Oct 10

Here is one shoot I styled with my friend Henny last semester!

It was inspired by early 20th century, theater, Toulouse Lautrec and Demi Mondes…

Photographed by Marta Dymek

Styling by Henny Jacobs, Laura Acosta

Thank you to Astrid and Bruce for all your help!

We’re up for some graphic treatment!
New York Fashion Week may seam like a hundred years ago, and yet, the fashion month has still some days to go.
We have seen so many collections, that it is not easy to understand what will stick, and what won’t. But I wanted to recollect some collections that really caught my eye, and that will certainly enter women’s mindset in the months to come. Even before spring arrives.
Especially in New York, but also with proposes from Marini, Prada and Dolce & Gabbana, the next season might be all about graphic prints, and Pop- and Op-Art-esque clothing. Call it sailor-, sports-inspired, or maybe a re-invention of the 1960’s, there were so many stripped two-tone examples on the runway, that we might want to take our sailor t-shirts out and maybe jump on the car and buy some stripped pants right away for fall.
I found the materials, in which these graphic textures were applied, quite interesting. Marc Jacobs not only did the silk jersey looking/Edie Sedgwick-inspired dresses, he also created Op-art patters with sequins. Michael Kors also added sequins to his Mod collection. I guess ready-to-wear doesn’t get any chicer than that.
On another note, Tommy Hilfiger’s stripped suits felt very patriotic, Victoria Beckham minimalism continues to be sports-driven, and Tom Browne’s stiff tailored ballerinas looked a lot like a Bauhaus-inspired graphic exercise.
Over in Milan, the prints-queen Marni presented a much more minimalist two-tone collection of interesting plaids and Japanese silhouettes. Some say she might have looked at Comme des Grarçons too long. Dolce & Gabbana enlivened the lives of their Sicilian girl, who strut the runway wearing huge earrings with brocade stripped dresses, ready to go about town and the beach. This certainly was Italy’s best kind of embellished minimalism.
From left to right, looks from Dolce & Gabbana, Marc Jacobs, Tommy Hilfiger, Tom Browne, Victoria Beckham, Michael Kors, Kate Spade, Marni.
Sep 30

We’re up for some graphic treatment!

New York Fashion Week may seam like a hundred years ago, and yet, the fashion month has still some days to go.

We have seen so many collections, that it is not easy to understand what will stick, and what won’t. But I wanted to recollect some collections that really caught my eye, and that will certainly enter women’s mindset in the months to come. Even before spring arrives.

Especially in New York, but also with proposes from Marini, Prada and Dolce & Gabbana, the next season might be all about graphic prints, and Pop- and Op-Art-esque clothing. Call it sailor-, sports-inspired, or maybe a re-invention of the 1960’s, there were so many stripped two-tone examples on the runway, that we might want to take our sailor t-shirts out and maybe jump on the car and buy some stripped pants right away for fall.

I found the materials, in which these graphic textures were applied, quite interesting. Marc Jacobs not only did the silk jersey looking/Edie Sedgwick-inspired dresses, he also created Op-art patters with sequins. Michael Kors also added sequins to his Mod collection. I guess ready-to-wear doesn’t get any chicer than that.

On another note, Tommy Hilfiger’s stripped suits felt very patriotic, Victoria Beckham minimalism continues to be sports-driven, and Tom Browne’s stiff tailored ballerinas looked a lot like a Bauhaus-inspired graphic exercise.

Over in Milan, the prints-queen Marni presented a much more minimalist two-tone collection of interesting plaids and Japanese silhouettes. Some say she might have looked at Comme des Grarçons too long. Dolce & Gabbana enlivened the lives of their Sicilian girl, who strut the runway wearing huge earrings with brocade stripped dresses, ready to go about town and the beach. This certainly was Italy’s best kind of embellished minimalism.

From left to right, looks from Dolce & Gabbana, Marc Jacobs, Tommy Hilfiger, Tom Browne, Victoria Beckham, Michael Kors, Kate Spade, Marni.

Sep 12

We go through yet another fashion week, and another generation of fashion and textiles designers takes the stage in Lincoln Center.

In the midst of fashion shows happening in a hectic New York City, Academy of Art fashion students showed their San Francisco-based work to an audience that every up-and-coming designer would die to present.

As always, the Academy showed very creative and beautifully executed collections. Many seemed more driven to the winter season rather than the spring/summer season.

In eight collections the Academy once again took its stance as a strong fashion school, with no amateur looking proposal. It was rather a very grownup show with several tailoring proposals and a sophisticated, sober aesthetic on many parts.

Stephina Touch presented one of the few collections with an actual spring-summery look. Her all white crisp collection made in silk satin suiting and silk organza brought geometric angles to the table. Her minimalist collection carried a range of dresses, coats and skirts with some lower-waist belts, very much suited for a Vogue editor. Yet, the belted looks and the sharp angels, which came from architectural clean lines and tiled roofs looked a little Karate-esque to me.

Another standout was Ginie C. Y. Huang’s neon collection inspired by the photographs of Japanese Ninagawa Mika. The collection followed a short hemlines with elbow length sleeve – very popular around runway shows – and rounded collars in an almost 60’s straight-line silhouette. This cleanness helped her balance the strength of color. Her skirt suit, and the sleeveless jacket/tunic over pants looks were fun proposals for office wear, as her quilting and feather embroideries helped the collection for looking too flat, bur rather tri-dimensional and airy.

Iglika Vasileva Matthews’ standout was her use of suede as the main character of her collection. The white, grey and sand colored material, was embossed and embellished with metallic dots at times. Her collection was yet another strong tailoring proposal, full of pants, coats, dresses and tops that looked rather light. Refreshing was the minimalism of her cut – inspired by architect Zaha Hadidand – as were the simple motives that her metallic dots created on the moving bodies of strutting models.

Jinsun Lee’s collection, in collaboration with textiles designer Liza Quiñones, was another tailoring proposal, this time playing with light and heavy silks in blue and green-jeweled tones. She also played with the idea of shiny silks and matte wools, in order to create contrast the panels – one of them being the sea-blue lapelled tunic. The collection had a look back to 1920’s men’s wear, with oversized jackets and long tunics, and the lapel as the spotlight element to complement simple shift dresses.

Another designer to play with lapels – and collars, bowties and pockets – was Jarida Karnjanasirirat from Thailand. Her collection was made in crisp and shinny silks in a lovely mixture of champagne, blush and silver tones. The soft color palette gave the look enough femininity for her to play with men’s wear based elements, this time in a three-dimensional, origami like way. These geometric shaped elements were raised from the clothing surface as sculptures, many times overlaying contrasting fabrics and textures in the subtlest way. Another statement of hers – shorts are back next spring – and we are talking office- to cocktail-time looks.

Yanfei Fan was maybe the student to grasp the most out of the spring feeling for next year. Her graphic black & white collection could be placed together with Marc Jacob’s and Diane von Furstenberg as an example of one of the must-haves of the season – sleek clothes with strong graphic elements. Her collection, inspired by modernist buildings, brought ton-sur-ton looks, tilted check prints and sharp horizontal cuts. The innocent peter pan collars, as well as the additions of shiny elements and feathers added to the textural game of her proposal.

Images Courtesy of WWD

(Source: fashionschooldaily.com)

Jul 27

Yayoi Kusama’s world of Dots

It seams like everything Yayoi Kusama does flows so naturally from her body and mind.

Here is a little portrait of this amazing artist’s world. Courtesy of Louis Vuitton

(Source: youtube.com)

Jul 6

The Little Black Jacket

A little black dress can be an iconic piece in a woman’s wardrobe. But what could be more iconic than a black tweed jacket when it comes to Chanel?

Envisioned by Coco Chanel, the little black jacket has evolved with the brand to the point that it deserved its own exhibition and book, photographed by the house’s creative director and photographer, Karl Lagerfeld.

Chanel’s staples, such as the tweed suit, the 2.55 bag, long peals necklaces, and even Chanel nr. 5 parfum have been re-enviosioned countless of times, with new muses and new versions. And, as all good things, they never get old. They , actually, are surprisingly modern. 

The strength of a Chanel symbol, as the black tweed jacket, was certainly felt in this simple, yet very well though out exhibition, which took place for only one week in Soho’s Swiss Institute Contemporary Art. The photographed personalities, actresses, designers, singers, and muses in general, were portrayed as no other than themselves, yet they all made this jacket their own.

The book comes out in August. I also took a look, and it’s beautiful.

I was happy to take home Vanessa Paradis and Elle Fanning’s posters!!

Jun 20

Musing on Prada and Schiaparelli’s Conversations

At the MET - This was my first visit to one of the costume exhibitions at the iconic art museum, and yet, these two women are discussing whether their work is art or not, even more, what art is and what artists stand for. Miuccia Prada drops the subject stating: “Who cares?” and they agree to disagree. Even so, their works are protected, sometimes by a glass wall, almost sanctifying them – like art.

The latest fashion exhibition by the Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art is called “Schiaparelli and Prada: Impossible Conversations,” and it, figuratively and literally, is about the intertwining between Miuccia Prada and Elsa Schiaparelli’s work. Impossible, as they live in different periods – Schiaparelli, or Schiap, are her friends called her died in 1973 and the highlight of her career were the 30s and 40s, whereas Prada has been leading the course of fashion ever since the late 1980s when she took the head of her family business founded by her grandfather Mario Prada. Her collections continue to be as mouth dropping as they were when she made utilitarian nylon the ultimate fabric for accessories  - and clothing – so much that her fall/winter 2012 collection is showcased at the museum, without having hit the stores yet. The collection will certainly be a sellout, as fashion editors all over America and Europe are fighting for exclusive samples for their most expected September issues.

The clothes are displayed in red, white or transparent open “boxes” in front of a projection of bits of Prada and Schiaparelli’s conversation on the themes showcased in front. The two iconic Italian fashion designers are having quite the glamorous talk over drinks on opposite sides of a dark wooden table under a crystal chandelier. The short film was directed by Baz Luhrmann, and in the dialog – based on Schiaparelli’s memoir and Prada’s own persona – they converse around anecdotes of how they ended up in fashion and their intentions as women designers.

Prada and Schiap’s conversations appear intrinsically in the correlations of their work. However, the relationship is never literal – not like Prada being inspired by Schiap’s jackets, and then creating her version of such (everyone is tired of that) – but rather both designers ultimately discus relevant issues in the lives of women, and the value of clothes in that sense.

Neither Prada nor Schiaparelli were considered pretty girls when they were young – Schiap said her own mother told her she was ugly. Prada didn’t feel like the most beautiful as a young girl in Milan either.  In a way, fashion was their escape to all of that. Not as a way to hide their insecurities, but as a creative medium to discuss what is beautiful, and what makes a woman attractive. Yes, they are feminists.

And yes, their ideas of beauty are not the same, even if they have a taste for beadings, new, unconventional materials, and art in common. Elsa Schiaparelli, a designer from the 30s and 40s who died in 1973, far before Prada even started thinking about a career in fashion, draw the attention to the woman’s upper body, as way of making beautiful what a simple face wouldn’t do. Thus she was an amazing milliner – making hats from the form of a high-heeled shoe – loved jackets with padded shoulders (which everyone in Hollywood copied afterwards), and also created a lot of neckpieces, not precisely jewelry, but bold necklaces made of random metals and materials.

Prada, herself, would never turn the attention to the upper body, intentionally. She prefers skirts, bottom pieces, and shoes – crazy shoes.

It is only logical that the curators of the exhibition decided to showcase Prada’s shoes along with Schiaparelli’s hats and necklaces, and the contemporary designer’s embellished skirts, along with Schiap’s one of a kind jackets.

Later on, the audience gets to see specific themes of their work that relate, and simultaneously, oppose to each other. These were separated into “white space boxes,” each one with their own name, quotes to be read, and dialog to be seen and heard. Basically it is an all senses exhibition, with an almost simplistic and intellectual approach. The white spaces were named “Hard Chic,” “The Exotic Body,” “Naïf Chic,” “The Classical Body,” and maybe the most important of them all: “Ugly Chic” for what Prada is most famous for. Prada’s collections always carry an element of something that people would take as ugly, but she always deconstructs it into very appealing garments. With “Ugly Chic” Prada could also discus the main ideas around luxury fashion, using synthetics fibers as much as silk and wool, and uniform-like clothes as the latest expression of feminine modernity.

Schiaparelli’s work was more thematic as Prada, but she also shocked people by her choices of color – fuchsia was named by her perfume – and by changing the ideas of what women should or not use. Her trousers-skirts were revolutionary and controversial, as were her appliqués of plastic bug-shapes beadings to her clothes or the use of anything but buttons as buttons.

The last gallery named “The Surreal Body” compared specific garments of each designer with each other, or photographs in the case of Schiaparelli. This gallery discusses the idea of fashion as art, and designers as artists. Schiaparelli gained much of her fame from collaborating with Salvador Dali, and creating lobster hats and lobster printed dresses. At the same time, Prada, who is an avid art ambassador, has been inspired by art – especially surrealism – as a way of exploring the woman’s body, its shape limits, and analogies to animals with the use of unexpected materials like feathers, crinkled ombré wools, or mini kitchen as beadings.

In the end, both women were proving how fashion has the ability to shape identity. And how their work is not only for the sake of clothes … it is the way the live/lived.

(Source: metmuseum.org)

Jun 18

Is Fashion Therapeutic?

According to this PRADA video, it certainly is. 

It is also about having fun, and expressing a version of yourself, or your true self.

PRADA might suit more than one. Cartainly!

Starring in this video, which was presented in Cannes, are Helena Bonham Carter and Sir Ben Kingsley.